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THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG "AMERICAN PIE": THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED

THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG
The day the music died, called by Don McLean's song "American Pie", was an aviation accident that occurred on 3 February 1959, near Clear Lake, Iowa, killing rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and JP "the Big Bopper" Richardson, as well as the pilot, Roger Peterson.

After the termination of its partnership with The Crickets, Buddy Holly formed a new band consisting of Waylon Jennings, Tommy Allsup, Carl and bundles to play in Winter Dance Party tour. The tour also features rising artist Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper Richardson, who are promoting their records, as well. The tour was to cover twenty-four Midwestern cities in three weeks. The distance between the venue, and the poorly-equipped bus, affected the performers and their bands. Cases of flu spread among them and Holly's drummer was hospitalized due to frostbite. Frustrated by conditions, Holly decided to charter a plane when stopped for their performance in the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa to reach their next place in Moorhead, Minnesota. Carroll Anderson, owner of the Surf Ballroom, chartered the plane from the Dwyer Flying Service.

Big Bopper Richardson, who has been affected by the flu, swapped places with Waylon Jennings' plane, while Tommy Allsup lost his place to Ritchie Valens in a Coin Toss. Meanwhile Dion DiMucci decided not to board the plane for US $ 36 fee. The investigation of the incident determined soon after Takeoff, a combination of poor weather conditions and pilot error caused by spatial disorientation pilot Roger Peterson made ​​to lose control of the plane. Hubert Dwyer, owner of the flight services company, unable to establish radio contact and was reported missing the next morning the aircraft. Splitting he himself Cessna 180 and saw the wreckage less than 6 miles (9.7 km) north-west of the airport in a cornfield belonging to Albert Juhl. He advised the authorities dispatched Deputy Bill McGill, which led to the wreck site and found the bodies of the passengers and pilot. They were later identified by Carroll Anderson.

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